TTUHSC - Announcements and Events

Problems in (Nano)Medical Mechanics

Friday, November 15, 2013 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Location: 101 Livermore Center - TTU Campus

MAURO FERRARI, PHD, NOVEMBER 15, 2013 AT 2:00 P.M. 101 LIVERMORE CENTER - TTU Campus

PRESIDENTS’ DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES IN ENGINEERING, SCIENCE AND MEDICINE and DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINARS Lecture by Mauro Ferrari, PhD Title: Problems in (Nano)Medical Mechanics

Mauro Ferrari, Ph.D.
Ernest Cockrell Jr. Distinguished Endowed Chair
President and CEO, Houston Methodist Research Institute
Director, Institute for Academic Medicine at Houston Methodist Hospital
Executive Vice President, Houston Methodist Hospital System

Nanotechnologies are of great interest in the context of the drive toward individualized medicine, and may prove to be the
necessary catalyst for its large-scale implementation. In this talk I will present nanoporous-silicon-based approaches for the
individualization of medical intervention: multistage vectors for the preferential localization of therapeutic agents; therapeutic
monitoring nanotextured chips for the proteomic and peptidomic content profiling of biological samples; nanochannel delivery
systems for intelligent time-release from implants, and bionanoscaffolds for post-traumatic osteoregeneration.

While novel nanoplatforms engender direct clinical applications, at the same time they afford the formulation of novel
frameworks and hypotheses for the basic understanding of pathological processes. In particular, multistage particulates are
the probes that afford the exploration of a new perspective of cancer, that is, that the unifying aspect of the canonical
‘hallmarks of cancers’ all relate to dys-regulation of mass transport at scales including the molecular, cellular,
microenvironmental, and systemic. These considerations are the starting point for “Transport OncoPhysics”.

In this talk I will present a series of fundamental problems in mechanics that not only underlie the entire field of nanomedicine,
but actually offer yet unexplored opportunities for new approaches to understanding the very foundations of health and
disease.

Add To Calendar
return to main page