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Unit 1: Introduction to Two Basic Research Issues: Copyright & Plagiarism

When writing a paper or presenting research, it is always the author's professional responsibility to acknowledge copyrighted materials as well as another author's borrowed text or ideas. Insinuating that the words or ideas of another are the author's own, without providing proper credit, may be considered plagiarism or an infringement of copyright laws. Proper citing and referencing show the results of an informed and ethical author.

 

Goal:

To have a basic understanding of the legal and ethical implications and responsibilities concerning copyright and plagiarism.

 

Objectives:

When this part is completed, the student will be able to:

  1. Find basic copyright information on the web.
  2. Understand why copyright is important.
  3. Describe the components of "ethical writing".
  4. Name guidelines for avoiding plagiarism.
  5. Locate tools that help format citations.

 

Activities:

Part 1: Copyright (45 points of 100, 5 points each)

  1. Read the question and answer in Frequently Asked Questions About Copyright, question 3.1.2, at http://www.cendi.gov/publications/04-8copyright.html#312. Then answer the question in Sakai.
  2. Read pages 1-5 of Copyright Basics at http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf and then answer the eight questions in Sakai.

Part 2: Plagiarism (45 points of 100)

Go to http://ori.hhs.gov/avoiding-plagiarism-self-plagiarism-and-other-questionable-writing-practices-guide-ethical-writing. Important! Download the PDF of this Module: Avoiding plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and other questionable writing practices: A guide to ethical writing by Miguel Roig, Ph.D. Read this document and How to recognize plagiarism (see resource list). Then complete the seven exercises in Sakai.

 

Unit Quiz (10 points)

Please answer the questions in Sakai. All questions and exercises for this unit must be completed by September 5, 2014, 5:00pm.

 

Evidence:

  1. Fill-in-the-blanks copyright activity.
  2. Plagiarism exercises, which includes a 1.5-2-page essay.
  3. Unit quiz.

 

Instructors:

Candia Thew, M.L.S.

Lubbock LRC, Room 221

Phone: (806) 743-2202

Fax: (806) 743-2218

E-mail: candia.thew@ttuhsc.edu

 

Peggy J. Edwards, A.M.L.S.

Lubbock Reference, Room 243

Phone: (806) 743-2212

Fax: (806) 743-2218

E-mail: peggy.edwards@ttuhsc.edu

 

Richard C. Wood, M.L.S.

Lubbock Administration, Room 260

Phone: (806) 743-2203

Fax: (806) 743-2218

E-mail: richard.wood@ttuhsc.edu

 

Resources

Copyright Resources:

CENDI Copyright Working Group, Bonnie Klein, and Gail Hodge, eds. Frequently Asked Questions About Copyright: 2.1.1 What is Copyright? CENDI: Federal STI Managers Group. CENDI Secretariat: Information International Associates, Inc., 08 Oct 2008. Web. 1 May 2014. Retrieved from http://www.cendi.gov/publications/04-8copyright.html

Harper, G. (2001, 2007). Copyright crash course. (Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License ed.). Austin, TX: University of Texas Libraries. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu

Library of Congress, United States Copyright Office. (2014) Copyright. Retrieved from United States Copyright Office website: http://www.copyright.gov

Library of Congress, U.S. Copyright Office. (2012). Copyright Basics: Circular 1. Retrieved from U.S. Government Printing Office website: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf

Library of Congress, U.S. Copyright Office. (2012) Fair use factsheet #FL102. Retrieved from United States Government Printing Office website: http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html

Library of Congress, U.S. Copyright Office. Information Circulars and Factsheets Index. Retrieved from United States Government Printing Office website: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/index.html

National Council of Teachers of English. International Reading Association. readwritethink. Can I Use It? Checklist for Copyright Clearance. (2007) Retrieved from http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson1085/CanIUseIt.pdf

National Council of Teachers of English. International Reading Association. readwritethink. Checklist for Fair Use. (2007) Retrieved from http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson1085/CanIUseIt.pdf

Plagiarism:

Roig, Miguel. Avoiding plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and other questionable writing practices: A guide to ethical writing. Office of Research Integrity. Retrieved from http://ori.hhs.gov/education/products/plagiarism/

What is plagiarism? Retrieved from http://www.plagiarism.org

Indiana University Bloomington, School of Education. How to recognize plagiarism. Retrieved from http://www.indiana.edu/~istd

Citation Resources:

Delaney, Robert. AMA citation style. Retrieved from http://www2.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/workshop/citama.html

American Psychological Association. APA style. Retrieved from http://www.apastyle.org

Endnote tutorial. Retrieved from http://www.ttuhsc.edu/libraries/bibliographic/endnote.aspx

Refworks. Retrieved from http://www.ttuhsc.edu/libraries/bibliographic/refworks.aspx

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