TTUHSC Pandemic Flu Initiative
HomePandemic Flu

Healthcare Provider Preparedness

Long-Term Care and Other Residential Facilities Pandemic Influenza Planning

experiment using H5N1 avian influenza virus

The checklist identifies key areas: a structure for planning and decision making, and a written plan with subplans.

photo by S. Fortenberry or M. VugrinHealth Insurer Pandemic Influenza Planning

In the event of an influenza pandemic, national and regional health insurers will have several key responsibilities: protecting their employees’ health and safety, providing coverage and related services to their enrollees, and coordinating access to care through the provider community. Pandemic influenza planning is critical and will help limit the negative impact on our economy and society. To assist health insurers in their efforts, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have developed the following checklist. It identifies important, targeted activities health insurers can do now to prepare for a pandemic. This checklist is organized according to business-related, employee-related, and communications-related activities. Please consider incorporating these pandemic-specific elements into your current all-hazards business continuity plan. Please access http://www.pandemicflu.gov/ for additional information, including planning assumptions and tools and guidelines for health-care planning.



Healthcare Workers and Healthcare Employers

This guidance provides a wide range of information and tools helpful to pandemic planners, including: Internet resources, communication tools, sample infection control programs, and self-triage and home care resources. It also offers how-to advice on diagnosis and treatment of staff during a pandemic, developing planning and supply checklists, and risk communication.



Hospital Pandemic Influenza Planning Checklist

Planning for pandemic influenza is critical for ensuring a sustainable healthcare response. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with input from other Federal partners, have developed this checklist to help hospitals assess and improve their preparedness for responding to pandemic influenza. Because of differences among hospitals (e.g., characteristics of the patient population, size of the hospital/community, scope of services), each hospital will need to adapt this checklist to meet its unique needs and circumstances. 1 This checklist should be used as one of several tools for evaluating current plans or in developing a comprehensive pandemic influenza plan. Additional information can be found at www.pandemicflu.gov.



Cover Your Cough

Includes flyers and posters, in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Vietnamese, Tagalog, Chinese, Hmong, and Khmer.



Stopping the Spread of Germs At Work

Basic precautions for protecting employee health.



Home Health Care Services Pandemic Influenza Planning Checklist

Planning for pandemic influenza is critical. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed the following checklist to help public and private organizations that provide home health care services assess and improve their preparedness for responding to pandemic influenza. Home health agencies will likely be called upon to provide care for patients who do not require hospitalization for pandemic influenza, or for whom hospitalization is not an option because hospitals have reached their capacity to admit patients. These agencies may become overburdened very quickly and shortages of personnel and supplies for providing home health care may occur. This checklist is modeled after the one included in the HHS Pandemic Influenza Plan(www.flu.gov/planning-preparedness/federal/hhspandemicinfluenzaplan.pdf). The list is comprehensive but not complete; each home care agency will have unique and unanticipated issues that will need to be addressed as part of a pandemic planning exercise. Also, some items on the checklist may not be applicable to a given agency. Collaboration with hospitals, local pandemic planning committees and public health agencies will be essential to ensure that the affected population receives needed health care services. Further information can be found atwww.pandemicflu.gov.

Medical Offices and Clinics Pandemic Influenza Planning Checklist

Planning for pandemic influenza is critical for ensuring a sustainable healthcare response. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have developed the following checklist to help medical offices and ambulatory clinics assess and improve their preparedness for responding to pandemic influenza. This checklist is modeled after a pandemic preparedness checklist for hospitals and should be used in conjunction with guidance on healthcare preparedness planning in Supplement 3 of the HHS Pandemic Influenza Plan. Many of the issues included in the checklist are also relevant to other outpatient settings that provide episodic and chronic healthcare services (e.g., dental, podiatric, and chiropractic offices, ambulatory surgery centers, hemodialysis centers). Given the variety of healthcare settings, individual medical offices and clinics may need to adapt this checklist to meet their unique needs. Further information can be found at www.pandemicflu.gov.

  • in html format: http://www.pandemicflu.gov/plan/healthcare/medical.html 
  • in .pdf format: http://www.pandemicflu.gov/plan/pdf/medofficesclinics.pdf

Emergency Medical Services and Non-Emergent (Medical) Transport Organizations Pandemic Influenza Planning Checklist

Planning for pandemic influenza is critical for ensuring a sustainable health care response. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have developed the following checklist to help emergency medical services (EMS) and non-emergent (medical) transport organizations assess and improve their preparedness for responding to pandemic influenza. EMS organizations will be involved in the transport of acutely ill patients with known or suspected pandemic influenza to emergency departments; some of these patients might require mechanical ventilation for life support and/or other lifesaving interventions. Non-emergent (medical) transport organizations will be called upon to transport recovering pandemic influenza patients to their home, residential care facility, or possibly to alternate care sites set up by state or local health departments. This checklist is modeled after one included in the HHS Pandemic Influenza Plan (www.flu.gov/planning-preparedness/federal/hhspandemicinfluenzaplan.pdf). The list is comprehensive but not complete; each organization will have unique and unanticipated concerns that also will need to be addressed as part of a pandemic planning exercise. Also, some items on the checklist might not be applicable to all organizations. Collaborations among hospital, public health and public safety personnel are encouraged for the overall safety and care of the public. Further information can be found at www.pandemicflu.gov.

Providing Mass Medical Care with Scarce Resources- A Community Planning Guide (US Department of Health and Human Services)

For State, local, community, and facility planners, this guide discusses ethical and legal issues, and considerations regarding prehospital care, hospital/acute care, palliative care, and alternative care sites. Chapter 8 is a 29-page case study for a flu pandemic.

Pandemic Influenza Information for Health Professionals (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the toolkit provides resources and information for clinicians to use in discussing pandemic influenza with patients and providing care in case of a flu pandemic in the United States.

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