TEXAS JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH

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ISSUE 21(2), 2003

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Editor’s Comments
James E. Rohrer, Ph.D.
FULL TEXT | PDF
 
Guest Editorial
John M. Kutch, Jr., D.P.A., F.A.C.H.E.
FULL TEXT | PDF

Notes From the Field

Assessment of a Colonia Language Intervention on Hispanic Immigrant Acculturation and Employment Status
Vern Vincent, Ph.D., Bobby Guinn, Ph.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 5-12
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Developing an Ambulance Network Model for Texas Rural Counties
Robert D. Galloway, Ph.D., Michael J. Bianchi
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 13-19
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF

Policy and Law

The Texas Office of Rural Community Affairs: Will State Agency Reorganization Improve Rural Health Care in Texas?
Brian K. Collins, Ph.D., Brian J. Gerber, Ph.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 20-30
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF

Research

The Epidemiology of Unintentional Non-fatal Injuries Among Children in the South Plains/Panhandle Region of Texas
Ahmed A. Arif, Ph.D., Patti J. Patterson, M.D., M.P.H.,
Tyrone F. Borders, Ph.D., Syed M. Shah, Ph.D., M.B.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 31-41
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Weight Gain Efforts Among Middle School and Junior High Students in Selected Rural Texas School Districts
LuAnn Soliah, Ph.D., R.D., Janelle Walter, Ph.D., R.D.,
Sunni Barnes, M.A., Scott Yeang
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 42-50
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Satisfaction With Care Among Patients With
Osteoporosis or Osteopenia
James E. Rohrer, Ph.D., Majorie R. Jenkins, M.D., Gina Kruse, M.S.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 51-59
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF

ABSTRACTS

 
Assessment of a Colonia Language Intervention on Hispanic
Immigrant Acculturation and Employment Status
Vern Vincent, Ph.D., Bobby Guinn, Ph.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 5-12

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of a colonia English-language intervention on acculturation and employment status. Participants were adult Hispanic immigrants, mean age 36.4 years, residing in a colonia community located three miles from the Texas-Mexico border. Intervention length was nine months and consisted of a minimum of four hours instruction per week in conversational topics. Pre- and post-intervention acculturation and employment status measures were obtained for all enrolled (N=103). At its nine-month conclusion, 25 participants completed the program and 78 had dropped out. Analysis indicated significantly greater acculturation gain for completers as well as a significantly greater probability of his or her being currently employed. The intervention’s impact on participant long-term well being remains to be determined; however, by positively affecting English-language usage and economic status, its results are encouraging.

Key words: acculturation, colonias, English language, health care access, Hispanic populations, Texas-Mexico border. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 5-12)

Author Affiliations

  • Vern Vincent, Ph.D., Professor, Department of CIS and Quantitative Methods, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas
  • Bobby Guinn, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Health and Kinesiology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, Texas

Developing an Ambulance Network Model for Texas Rural Counties
Robert D. Galloway, Ph.D., Michael J. Bianchi
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 13-19

Abstract

The Texas rural health care setting is plagued with limitations stemming from a lack of health care resources. The purpose of this article is to assist emergency medical services (EMS) planners in creating an effective and efficient ambulance network model. The article examines the existing network models already in use by rural Texas counties and presents a model for developing a new ambulance network. This article examines variables that are important to consider when developing an ambulance deployment model decentralized from a hospital. The model is based on the premise of decentralizing ambulance deployment stations away from a central depot or hospital and locating them throughout the county. The ultimate goal is to reduce response times and save lives.

Key words: ambulance, rural model, Texas. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 13-19)

Author Affiliations

  • Robert D. Galloway, Ph.D., Instructor, Department of Health Administration, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas
  • Michael J. Bianchi, Graduate Student, Department of Health Administration, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas

The Texas Office of Rural Community Affairs: Will State Agency
Reorganization Improve Rural Health Care in Texas?
Brian K. Collins, Ph.D., Brian J. Gerber, Ph.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 20-30

Abstract

This article examines the potential impact of state agency reorganization on the future of rural health care in Texas. Recent surveys of rural residents and their community leaders suggest that rural health care leaders and local government executives have different priorities for rural development. These different perceptions potentially create obstacles for the Texas Office of Rural Community Affairs (ORCA) to construct a rural development agenda that strongly emphasizes rural health care and fully uses agency resources in support of rural health.

Key words: agency reorganization, ORCA, rural health, Texas. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 20-30)

Author Affiliations

  • Brian K. Collins, Ph.D., Faculty Member, Department of Political Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
  • Brian J. Gerber, Ph.D., Faculty Member, Department of Political Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas

The Epidemiology of Unintentional Non-fatal Injuries Among Children
in the South Plains/Panhandle Region of Texas
Ahmed A. Arif, M.D., Ph.D., Patti J. Patterson, M.D., M.P.H.,
Tyrone F. Borders, Ph.D., Syed M. Shah, Ph.D., M.B.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 31-41

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to estimate and characterize the burden of unintentional injuries among children under 16 years of age in the South Plains/Panhandle region of Texas. A total of 1,500 households were selected through a cross-sectional survey in 42 counties in the fall of 2001. Telephone interviews with parents were conducted to identify the nature and place of injury among children. The age-adjusted prevalence of parent-reported childhood injury was 15.9%. Out of 228 children injured, the majority (88%) needed medical attention. The majority of injuries occurred while the child was engaged in sports or other related recreational activity, followed by unintentional falls, and accidents at home. Compared to younger children (< 6 years), older children (11 to 16 years) were more likely to sustain injuries. A total of 35 (17.6%) children required hospital admission following their injuries. Those in the lower level socioeconomic group (as determined by the responding parents’ educational status) were more likely to seek admission to the hospital following injury. In the South Plains/Panhandle region, the occurrence of unintentional injuries is a significant health problem resulting in hospitalization and loss of routine activity. Further analytical studies are needed to identify more specific risk factors that can serve as a basis for prevention efforts.

Key words: childhood injuries, epidemiology, rural health, Texas Panhandle. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 31-41)

Author Affiliations

  • Ahmed A. Arif, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services, Research and Management, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas.
  • Patti J. Patterson, M.D., M.P.H., Vice President, Rural & Community Health, Medical Director, Center for Telemedicine/Telehealth, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas
  • Tyrone F. Borders, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services, Research and Management, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas
  • Syed M. Shah, Ph.D., M.B., Epidemiologist, Department of Health, Olympia, Washington

Weight Gain Efforts Among Middle School and Junior High Students
in Selected Rural Texas School Districts
LuAnn Soliah, Ph.D., R.D., Janelle Walter, Ph.D., R.D.,
Sunni Barnes, M.A., Scott Yeang
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 42-50

Abstract

Three rural Texas school districts were studied to determine why, when, and how middle school and junior high students (n=468) decide to gain weight. The main reason to gain weight was to overcome thinness and thus improve physical appearance. Children as young as seven-years-old were making an effort to gain weight. The dominant method used was to consume more food. Inappropriate methods and reasons were occasionally involved with the attempt to gain weight.

Key words: adolescents, weight gain, body size. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 42-50)

Author Affilations

  • LuAnn Soliah, Ph.D., R.D., Professor and Director of Nutrition Sciences, Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Baylor University, Waco, Texas
  • Janelle Walter, Ph.D., R.D., Professor, Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Baylor University, Waco, Texas
  • Sunni Barnes, M.A., Statistician, Hankamer School of Business, Baylor University, Waco, Texas
  • Scott Yeang, Nutrition Sciences Student, Baylor University, Waco, Texas

Satisfaction With Care Among Patients With Osteoporosis or Osteopenia
James E. Rohrer, Ph.D., Majorie R. Jenkins, M.D., Gina Kruse, M.S.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 51-59

Abstract

This study investigated the independent predictors of being diagnosed with osteoporosis or osteopenia and also satisfaction with medical care among a sample of women over age 65 in West Texas. Satisfaction with physician services was assessed to determine whether counseling for bone density disease was adequate. Data were obtained from 2004 women who resided in a 106-county area that ranged from the Panhandle of Texas to El Paso. Women who were in poor health in general were more likely to have been diagnosed with bone density disease. Women who had been diagnosed with bone density disease reported lower satisfaction scores than women with other chronic diseases. Communication with their physicians was the primary reason for dissatisfaction.

Key words: epidemiology, osteoporosis, satisfaction with services. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(2): 51-59)

Author Affiliation

  • James E. Rohrer, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Health Services, Research and Management, TTUHSC, School of Medicine, Lubbock, Texas
  • Marjorie R. Jenkins, M.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, TTUHSC, School of Medicine, Amarillo, Texas
  • Gina Kruse, M.S., Research Aide, Department of Health Services, Research and Management, TTUHSC, School of Medicine, Lubbock, Texas
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