TEXAS JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH

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ISSUE 21(3), 2003
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Editor’s Comments
James E. Rohrer, Ph.D.
FULL TEXT | PDF
 

Notes From the Field

Health Literacy Assessment of Patients in Rural Florida
Kimberly Harper, Ph.D., M.P.H., Melva Thompson-Robinson, Dr.P.H., Marisa Lewis, Pharm.D., M.P.H.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 3-8
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Using Outreach Endeavors to Determine Hispanic Diabetics
Carol Boswell, R.N., Ed.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 9-14
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Telemedicine Burn Project at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Debbie Voyles, M.B.A.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 15-18
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Ophthalmologic Care Among Diabetic Mexician-American Adults Residing in a Colonia
Mark Gallardo, M.D., Arthur Islas, M.D., Darryl M. Williams, M.D., M.P.H.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 19-26
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Using Partnerships in Developing a Diverse RN Workforce on the South Plains of Texas
Elizabeth Amos, R.N., Ph.D., Alexia Green, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N., Mike McMurry, R.N.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 27-38
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF

Policy and Law

A Rural Texan Talks About Policy and Health Care in Rural Texas
Ramsey L. Longbotham
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 39-45
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF

Research

The Impact of Rural Hospital Closure on the Economic Health of the Local Communities
David R. Pearson, C.H.E., M.P.A., Hassan Tajalli, Ph.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 46-51
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF
Commentary of The Impact of Rural Hospital Closure on the Economic Health of the Local Communities
Richard Hoeth, FACHE
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 52-53
FULL TEXT | PDF
Pediatric Emergency Departments: "Safety-Net" Providers for Vulnerable Children
Lonnie C. Roy., Ph.D., Susan Brown Eve, Ph.D., Naveed Ahmad, M.D., M.P.H.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 54-69
ABSTRACT | FULL TEXT | PDF

Book Review

Review of "Mirror, Mirror: A History of the Human Love Affair with Reflection"
Lee Ann Paradise
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 70-71
FULL TEXT | PDF

ABSTRACTS

Health Literacy Assessment of Patients in Rural Florida
Kimberly Harper, Ph.D., M.P.H., Melva Thompson-Robinson, Dr.P.H., Marisa Lewis, Pharm.D., M.P.H.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 3-8

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to gain a greater understanding of the health literacy needs of a rural minority population in Gadsden County, Florida. The Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA) was used to assess health literacy levels among participants. Twenty-nine participants out of 30 (93%) had adequate functional health literacy. The STOFHLA is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring functional health literacy. Limitations of this study are as follows: the population from which the participants were recruited was biased, the number of participants recruited was small, and the recruited participants may not have represented the larger populations.

Key words: African-American women, Hispanic-American women, health literacy, rural Florida. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 3-8)

Author Affiliations

  • Kimberly Harper, Ph.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Institute of Public Health, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, Florida
  • Melva Thompson-Robinson, Dr.P.H., Assistant Professor, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Institute of Public Health, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, Florida
  • Marisa Lewis, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor, Health Care Management, School of Allied Health Sciences, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, Florida

Using Outreach Endeavors to Determine Hispanic Diabetics
Carol Boswell, R.N., Ed.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 9-14

Abstract

Supporting the Hispanic population with the management of diabetes mellitus is escalating into an overriding challenge for health care providers. Developing an effective outreach undertaking is one mechanism for addressing barriers that restrict access to health services for Hispanic clients. This discussion of one clinically focused outreach endeavor is presented to provide a framework for considering the implications for practice when working toward the successful management of key risk factors related to the disease process.

Key words: diabetics, Hispanic population, outreach, Texas. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 9-14)

Author Affiliations

  • Carol Boswell, R.N., Ed.D., Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Odessa, Texas

Telemedicine Burn Project at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Debbie Voyles, M.B.A.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 15-18

Abstract

Many people, whether young or old, will be affected by a burn injury at some point in their lives. This article discusses the telemedicine burn project at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC). It addresses some of the challenges that rural patients face when seeking treatment and discusses solutions through telemedicine.

Key words: burn project, rural patients, telemedicine, TTUHSC. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 15-18).

Author Affiliations

  • Debbie Voyles, M.B.A., Administrative Director/Telemedicine Coordinator, Center for Telemedicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas

Ophthalmologic Care Among Diabetic Mexician-American Adults Residing in a Colonia
Mark Gallardo, M.D., Arthur Islas, M.D., Darryl M. Williams, M.D., M.P.H.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 19-26

Abstract

Ocular damage with possible progression to blindness is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. These changes can be diminished by early detection through regularly scheduled eye examinations and by intervention that includes better control of hyperglycemia. In Mexican-American populations, both type 2 diabetes and the ophthalmologic complications appear to be more prevalent and perhaps more severe than in the general population. Using a survey of diabetic patients enrolled in community clinics as well as a sponsored screening program, this study shows that access to eye care is inadequate within a small survey population drawn from residents of colonias along the Texas-Mexico border. These individuals are exclusively Mexican-American and also possess many of the characteristics of low socio-economic status that impede access to health care. At the same time, the reservoir of ophthalmologic disorders appears to be high, based upon the findings of a comprehensive screening program. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the need for new strategies employing provider and patient education as well as modified referral methods in order to improve the access to recommended health care services for this rural population.

Key words: diabetes, colonias, Mexican-American, ophthalmology, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, visual complications of diabetes. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 19-26)

Author Affiliations

  • Mark Gallardo, M.D., Resident Physician, Office of Border Health, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas
  • Arthur Islas, M.D., Assistant Professor, Office of Border Health, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas
  • Darryl M. Williams, M.D., M.P.H., Executive Director, Office of Border Health, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas

Using Partnerships in Developing a Diverse RN Workforce on the South Plains of Texas
Elizabeth Amos, R.N., Ph.D., Alexia Green, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N., Mike McMurry, R.N.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 27-38

Abstract

In an attempt to address the nursing shortage on the South Plains of West Texas, a unique partnership was formed between the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing (TTUHSC SON) and the South Plains WorkSource (SPWS). The goal of this union was to increase rural and minority community awareness of nursing as a profession and to enhance university efforts to recruit, retain, and graduate disadvantaged and rural students (DARS). The project used a simple model (Bessent, 1997) to guide enhanced efforts and strategies developed to meet DARS program objectives. The model emphasizes the strategy of community awareness and partnerships to enhance the overall process of recruitment, retention, and graduation of DARS. This article describes these major project strategies and evaluates their effectiveness in enhancing recruitment and retention of disadvantaged and rural students.

Key words: nursing, recruitment, rural West Texas, TTUHSC SON, SPWS. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 27-38)

Author Affiliations

  • Elizabeth "Libby" Amos, R.N., Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas
  • Alexia Green, R.N., Ph.D., F. A.A.N., Dean and Professor, School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas
  • Mike McMurry, R.N., Faculty Associate/Recruiter, School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas

A Rural Texan Talks About Policy and Health Care in Rural Texas
Ramsey L. Longbotham
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 39-45

Abstract

What can we say about health care for our rural areas in Texas these days? A lot has happened in recent years and we often talk more about the loss of services than we talk about improvements and access. However, we can say that policy, whether from the federal, state, or private level, has impacted the health care services we receive, and most of it has been in the budget arena. For every two steps forward, we seem to take one step back!

Key words: physician retention, quality care, rural health, rural hospitals, Texas. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 39-45)

Author Affiliations

  • Ramsey L. Longbotham, Executive Director, Texas Association of Rural Health Clinics, Austin, Texas

The Impact of Rural Hospital Closure on the Economic Health of the Local Communities
David R. Pearson, C.H.E., M.P.A., Hassan Tajalli, Ph.D.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 46-51

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to assess the economic impact of rural hospital closures on the local communities. The data used in this study are from 24 Texas rural counties that have experienced hospital closures matched with 24 equivalent Texas rural counties that did not have such experiences. This research uses a quasi-experimental design similar to the "Pre-test and Post-test Design with Nonequivalent Groups" design described by Cook and Campbell (1979). The results do not show that hospital closure has a significant short- or long-term harm on the economies of the rural counties examined in this study.

Key words: economics, hospital closure, rural health. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 46-51)

Author Affiliations

  • David R. Pearson, C.H.E., M.P.A., Director of Advocacy and Communications, Texas Organization of Rural and Community Hospitals, Austin, Texas
  • Hassan Tajalli, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas

Pediatric Emergency Departments: "Safety-Net" Providers for Vulnerable Children
Lonnie C. Roy., Ph.D., Susan Brown Eve, Ph.D., Naveed Ahmad, M.D., M.P.H.
Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003; 21(3): 54-69

Abstract

This research investigates the socio-economic conditions and health service use behaviors of children using an emergency department for non-emergent medical care and contrasts those to a random sample of children in the Dallas, Texas area. The use of hospital emergency departments for non-emergent care among children was significantly associated with lower socio-economic status and lack of medical insurance. Low income, minority, and uninsured children are disproportionately more likely to rely on hospital emergency departments to supplement or supply the array of health care needs typically provided in a physician's office.

Key words: non-emergent care, pediatric emergency, Texas children. (Texas Journal of Rural Health 2003;21(3): 54-69)

Author Affiliations

  • Lonnie C. Roy, Ph.D., Health Services Research Manager, Department of Planning, Children's Medical Center of Dallas, Dallas, Texas
  • Susan Brown Eve, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Applied Gerontology & Department of Sociology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
  • Naveed Ahmad, M.D., M.P.H., Biostatistician/Epidemiologist, Clinical Research Department, Children's Medical Center of Dallas, Dallas, Texas
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