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Department of Anesthesiology

Medical Student Rotation Information

The Department of Anesthesiology at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center offers a number of rotations for medical students. Programs are offered to medical students for the summer following the first year all the way through 4th year rotation. The list of rotations that are available through the Department of Anesthesiology are listed below.

intubation1

Preceptorship

Third Year Clerkship

Fourth Year Rotation

Visiting Students

Director of Medical Student Education

Residency Program Director

Preceptorship

The Medical Student Program in the Department of Anesthesiology allows first and second year medical students to rotate with and shadow physicians to gain hands-on experience. The preceptorship length is usually one to two weeks during the summer following the student's first or second year. If you would like to apply to do a preceptorship, please email Dr. Bettina Schmitz in the month of April prior to the summer you would like to do you preceptorship, with a letter stating why you would like to do a preceptorship, your Curriculum Vitae, and your contact information, including a cell phone number. Dr. Schmitz will then contact you if you are selected to do a preceptorship and arrangements will be made to begin your preceptorship.

Third Year Clerkship

The Department of Anesthesiology allows third year medical students to do a clerkship within the department one time per year, for 1 week. The following information gives a brief overview of the information the medical student will learn and provides a summary of the policies and procedures to follow in order to complete the clerkship.

Important Information:

Please review the following information prior to beginning your clerkship:

  • Introduction to Anesthesiology.The Introduction to Anesthesiology contains an overview of what will be covered during the rotation. You are not required to print the document, but it is highly recommended that you review the material prior to your first day.
  • Observation/Procedure Log. Please print a copy of the Log and bring it with you on your first day. The Log will ask you to document topics discussed and procedures observed/performed. Please return the completed Log to the medical student coordinator at the end of the rotation.

Please contact Dr. Schmitz the Friday before you start your rotation to find out where to assemble on the first day of your rotation.

Learning Objectives:

After participating in the discussions of a set of core management topics and applying these principles to the management of both simulated and actual patients during the delivery of monitored care, regional, and general anesthesia, students will be able to do the following: 

(Note: The student will have the opportunity to perform a preanesthetic assessment on a standardized patient, and perform anesthesia on at least four screen based simulated patients) 

Knowledge:  Describe and define:

  • The basic concepts involved in the administration of general anesthesia, including the pharmacology and physiology of anesthetic agents, fluid balance, neuromuscular monitoring, etc.
  • The diagnosis and clinical significance of diseases requiring special anesthetic considerations
  • Key sources for obtaining current information on issues relevant to the anesthetic management of adult and pediatric patients
  • Bioethics of care including the informed consent and advance directives as they apply to anesthetic management in the operating room

Skills:  Demonstrate the ability to:

  • Perform and accurately document a preanesthetic assessment on a standardized patient
  • Identify disease entities and physical findings that are clinically significant for the administration of a monitored care, regional, or general anesthetic
  • Select diagnostic tests required for the administration of a safe anesthetic plan
  • Interpret the results of diagnostic tests and describe their impact on the anesthetic plan
  • Assess the benefits of obtaining preoperative consultations from non-anesthesiologists for the safe delivery of an anesthetic
  • Communicate effectively with surgeons, operating room staff, patients, and their families, including perioperative considerations, concerns, and care, while using terminology appropriate for the participants in the discussion
  • Assess and classify the patient's airway as to the possible difficulty for intubation and determine the equipment that should be prepared for securing the airway
  • Determine the limits of medical knowledge regarding the patient’s condition

Attitudes:  Demonstrate professional attitudes by:

  • Placing priority on patient’s safety, comfort, and privacy during care of the alert, sedated, and conscious patient      
  • Reacting in an appropriate manner to the questions and concerns of the patient’s family
  • Recognizing own level of experience and training, in relation to patient’s condition and the complexity of the procedure
  • Continued and consistent active learning through discussions with anesthesia attendings and staff and through self-directed learning

intubation2**Intubation manikins are also available for medical students to practice with in the operating room.

Classes/Lectures:

The medical student will be provided with a current lecture schedule when the student begins the clerkship. Students are expected to be present at all lectures as part of the clerkship rotation.

Didactic materials:

Introduction to Anesthesiology:  (see link above).

Anesthesiology, by Ron Miller.  Available for loan upon request.

Operating Room Protocol:

Dr. Schmitz or the designated board runner will indicate which rooms are available for medical student teaching.  If you are not assigned to a specific team for the day, please discuss your desire to participate in a case that interests you, prior to the beginning of the case.

Please check out at the end of the day with Dr. Schmitz or the board runner.

Fourth Year Rotation

During the fourth year, medical students are provided the opportunity to do a two-week or one-month rotation with the Department of Anesthesiology. During this rotation, students are exposed to a hands-on environment throughout their rotation.

Important Information:

Please review the following information prior to beginning your rotation:

  • Introduction to Anesthesiology.The Introduction to Anesthesiology contains an overview of what will be covered during the rotation. You are not required to print the document, but it is highly recommended that you review the material prior to your first day.
  • Observation/Procedure Log. Please print a copy of the Log for each week you rotate with the Department of Anesthesiology (i.e. for a two week rotation, you will print off two logs) and bring the copies with you on your first day. The Log will ask you to document topics discussed and procedures observed/performed. Please return the completed Logs to medical student coordinator at the end of the rotation.

Please contact Dr. Schmitz the Friday before you start your rotation to find out where to assemble on the first day of your rotation.

Fourth Year Elective Rotations

  1. OR:

    During the fourth year, four-week Anesthesiology Clerkship, the medical student will rotate as a clinical clerk performing direct patient care in the operating room and the labor and delivery suite.  The clerk’s goal is to participate in the anesthetic management of a broad range of patient types and disease entities and to participate in discussions of a series of core topics with faculty and staff, as well as attend departmental conferences and journal clubs.  As a result, the clerk will develop basic competencies in the preanesthetic evaluation and advanced life support procedures, build a core knowledge of  the physiological and pharmacological basis of anesthesia, and acquire clinical skills, professional demeanor, and patient centered attitudes needed for the care of  perioperative patients. 

    The rotation may be tailored to each student’s career plan, for example, if a student plans to specialize in obstetrics, that student is assigned to the obstetrical anesthesia team for a significant portion of his or her rotation. All students will take a NBME based test based at the end of the rotation. 

  2. Pain:

    The Pain Medicine medical student rotation is designed to give students insights into the subspecialty of pain medicine.  The rotation is hands-on and illustrates the role of the pain doctor in the clinical setting. Students spend time in the main operating room and the southwest pain clinic. During the rotation, students are assigned to an individual faculty mentor to guide them and be responsible for their daily clinical activities. Students will become familiar with the many facets of the practice of pain medicine including the clinical in-office setting, as well as the hospital in-patient setting. By the end of the rotation, it is expected that the student will have developed an information base allowing them to identify and manage common pain problems facing pain medicine practitioners, develop an awareness and appreciation of the importance of patient safety, understand pharmacological dosing, effects, and complications related to various procedural techniques.

  3. Research: 

    The student will develop or expand his or her ability to understand the key elements of research including defining the goal of a project, conducting a focused literature search, developing a research plan of limited scope, and completing the plan.  The student will document in a final written report, the outcome of the project. Interested students must commit to a definable goal with an end product (presentation, literature review, etc.) completed at the end of the rotation. The project should relate to ongoing basic, translational, or clinical studies in progress. The applicant must submit resume and indicate interest to the Office of Student Affairs at least 3 months before wanting to start the rotation. The student must be making satisfactory progress through medical school.

Learning Objectives:

After participating in the discussions of a set of core management topics and applying these principles to the management of both simulated and actual patients during the delivery of monitored care, regional, and general anesthesia, students will be able to do the following: 

(Note: The student will have the opportunity to perform a preanesthetic assessment on a standardized patient, and perform anesthesia on at least four screen based simulated patients) 

Knowledge:  Describe and define:

  • The basic concepts involved in the administration of general anesthesia, including the pharmacology and physiology of anesthetic agents, fluid balance, neuromuscular monitoring, etc.
  • The diagnosis and clinical significance of diseases requiring special anesthetic considerations
  • Key sources for obtaining current information on issues relevant to the anesthetic management of adult and pediatric patients
  • Bioethics of care including the informed consent and advance directives as they apply to anesthetic management in the operating room

Skills:  Demonstrate the ability to:

  • Perform and accurately document a preanesthetic assessment on a standardized patient
  • Identify disease entities and physical findings that are clinically significant for the administration of a monitored care, regional, or general anesthetic
  • Select diagnostic tests required for the administration of a safe anesthetic plan
  • Interpret the results of diagnostic tests and describe their impact on the anesthetic plan
  • Assess the benefits of obtaining preoperative consultations from non-anesthesiologists for the safe delivery of an anesthetic
  • Communicate effectively with surgeons, operating room staff, patients and their families, including perioperative considerations, concerns, and care, while using terminology appropriate for the participants in the discussion
  • Assess and classify the patient's airway as to the possible difficulty for intubation, and to determine the equipment that should be prepared for securing the airway
  • Compose a literature review of an anesthesia related topic of interest to the student with approval by the Clerkship Director and assistance from a faculty attending (replaced by NBME based exam as of 8/08)
  • Determine the limits of medical knowledge regarding the patient’s condition

Attitudes:  Demonstrate professional attitudes by:

  • Placing priority on patient’s safety, comfort, and privacy during care of the alert, sedated, and conscious patient      
  • Reacting in an appropriate manner to the questions and concerns of the patient’s family
  • Recognizing own level of experience and training in relation to patient’s condition and the complexity of the procedure
  • Continued and consistent active learning through discussions with anesthesia attendings and staff and through self-directed learning

Classes/Lectures:

The medical student will be provided with a current lecture schedule when the student begins the clerkship. Students are expected to be present at all lectures as part of the clerkship rotation.

Didactic materials:

Introduction to Anesthesiology:  (see link above).

Anesthesiology, by Ron Miller.  Available for loan upon request.

Operating Room Protocol:

Dr. Schmitz or the designated board runner will indicate which rooms are available for medical student teaching.  If you are not assigned to a specific team for the day, please discuss your desire to participate in any case which interests you, prior to the beginning of the case.

Please check out at the end of the day with Dr. Schmitz or the board runner.

Best 4th Year Student

After the final rotation of the year, the Department of Anesthesiology honors and selects one student as the Best 4th Year Student and presents the student with the Best 4th Year Student Award. 

Visiting Students

Please click here for information regarding the application process for visiting students.

Director of Medical Student Education

Bettina Schmitz, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology

Residency Program Director

John Wasnick, MD,  Chairman and Professor of Anesthesiology, Residency Program Director, Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

If you would like to obtain more information about the Anesthesiology Residency Program, click here.

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