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Molecular Biophysics Concentration Coursedescriptions

GMBP 5321 Biochemistry and Biophysics of Membranes: This is a 3 credit hour course to introduce cell membranes and membrane proteins stressing the physical and chemical bases of cellular functions. The course starts with a review of physical chemistry and common biochemical and biophysical approaches applied to biology, and then focuses on major classes of membrane transport proteins, their structures and mechanisms of function. Lecture materials are supplemented by readings from textbooks, review articles and original research papers, as well as discussion of current research in the instructors’ laboratories. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. This course may be taken with GMBP 5221.

GMBP 5221 Experimental Biochemistry and Biophysics of Membranes: This is a parallel course to GMBP 5321 (Biochemistry and Biophysics of Membranes) with two credit hours. The main goal is to bridge the knowledge acquired in the classroom and experimental attitudes and skills necessary for dissertation work. The students will be involved in planning, performing, and analyzing classic experiments in the fields of biochemistry and biophysics of membranes, and the experiments will be carried out in several laboratories housed in the Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GMBP 5321.

GMBP 7101 Molecular Biophysics Seminar: Showcases internationally acclaimed researchers and provides the student with the most current information on a variety of interesting topics in cell physiology, as well as an introduction to state-of-the-art techniques and instrumentation. The seminar series includes work-in-progress and journal club style presentations from members of the department including those of students starting with the 3rd year.  This seminar series is a requirement and will be taken during the entire duration of the student’s time in the Ph.D. program.

GMBP 7102 Readings in Molecular Biophysics: This course is designed to complement the Molecular Biophysics Seminar Series and provide a forum for the students to become familiar with some of the speaker’s publications.  The readings course will examine the hypothesis that was tested, the techniques employed, the most important results obtained, and the conclusions that were drawn from the study and require that the students further develop skills in reading, analysis, integration of knowledge and oral presentation of original science articles and reviews. Before the seminar, students are asked to become familiar with some of the speaker’s publications.  The students take notes during the seminar and later submit a one-page report on the speaker’s presentation.  The report should include the hypothesis that was tested, the techniques employed, the most important results obtained, and the conclusions that were drawn from the study. This course is a requirement and will be taken during the entire duration of the student’s time in the graduate program.

GMBP 5350 Laboratory Methods in Molecular Biophysics: Fundamental principles of physiology and molecular biophysics are explored through a series of hands-on laboratory exercises.  Numerous techniques common to research in many fields will be introduced. 

GMBP 5360 Laboratory Rotations as an Introduction to Modern Physiological Research: This course is designed to introduce the student to state-of-the-art research in physiology and is usually taken during the summer after the first-year of classes.  Students will learn molecular, cellular and/or whole-animal research techniques, which will equip them with some of the skills to investigate the physiology of the human body with a focus on cellular and molecular biology, membrane biophysics, and membrane transport physiology.  The student will work in a specific laboratory, assisting in ongoing research or conducting a new project.  Students sometimes decide to continue in the same laboratory for their master’s or doctoral project.

GMBP 6305 Advanced Topics in Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics: These courses consist of three research tracks (molecular, cellular, biophysics) and are designed with (a) appropriate contents for the student’s interests (with a potential dissertation in mind); (b) emphasis on depth (rather than breadth) of knowledge; (c) appropriate revisiting and utilization of relevant contents from first-year courses, at a greater depth; (d) development of skills in reading, analysis, integration of knowledge and presentation (both oral and written) of scientific problems.  The main activity of the course will be directed reading of original science articles and reviews, developing critical thinking skills and problem solving processes. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

GMBP 5302 Human Physiology: This introductory graduate course provides the student with a basic understanding of the organ systems of the human body, including the functions, regulation, and interactions.

GMBP 7000 Research: Students conduct research under the direct supervision of a mentor in selected areas of interest. It is expected that the student will learn and develop techniques pertinent to their research area. The student will also read and present literature findings and their own data to mentor and personnel in their respective laboratory.

GMBP 8000 Doctoral Dissertation: provides the student with advanced research training in a faculty member’s laboratory.  It is taken after a student has successfully passed a “qualifying” examination, which includes a written grant proposal and an oral exam, and has been admitted to candidacy for a doctoral degree.  Students learn molecular, cellular, and biophysical research techniques, which will equip them with some of the skills required to investigate the molecular, cellular and biophysical approaches.  The student selects a committee of faculty members to give advice and then works in a specific laboratory, conducting his/her own research project.  After completing the project, publishing the results in one or more articles and writing a dissertation, which describes the hypotheses tested, methods used and results obtained, students present a research seminar to the faculty of the department and then defend their dissertation before their committee.

Please see GSBS catalogue for graduate course schedule.

 

MB Guidelines What is biophysics?

To apply for admission online, please visit the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Admissions web page.

For further information contact:
Michaela Jansen, PharmD/PhD, Graduate Advisor
Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics
michaela.jansen@ttuhsc.edu

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