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Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics

Course Descriptions

GPHY 5302 Human Physiology: This introductory graduate course provides the student with a basic understanding of the organ systems of the human body, including the functions, regulation, and interactions.

GPHY 5320 Molecular Cell Physiology: An introduction to the physical and chemical bases of cell physiology. This course starts with a review of physical chemistry applied to biology and focuses on membrane phenomena, muscle contraction and molecular aspects of signaling. Lecture material is supplemented by readings from textbooks, review articles, and original research papers. Can be taken together with course GPHY 5220.

GPHY 5220 Experiments in Molecular Cell Physiology: Alaboratory course coordinated with the topics of course GPHY 5320. The students will perform experiments that illustrate basic biophysical and physiological concepts, analyze the results and interpret them. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in GPHY 5320.

GPHY 5904 Systems Physiology: Provides the student with a basic understanding of the organ systems of the human body.  Their functions, regulation and interactions are emphasized.  Specifically, the objectives of the course are to describe the mechanisms that underlie the functions of the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, and endocrine systems of the body, and explain how these systems interact to maintain homeostasis of the whole body. This course is not taken by students in the Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics concentration.

GPHY 7101, 7104-7110 Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics Seminar: Showcases internationally acclaimed researchers and provides the student with the most current information on a variety of interesting topics in cell physiology, as well as an introduction to state-of-the-art techniques and instrumentation. The seminar series includes work-in-progress and journal club style presentations from members of the department including those of students starting with the 3rd year.  This seminar series is a requirement and will be taken during the entire duration of the student’s time in the Ph.D. program.

GPHY 7120-7130 Readings in Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics: This course is designed to complement the Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics Seminar Series and provide a forum for the students to become familiar with some of the speaker’s publications.  The readings course will examine the hypothesis that was tested, the techniques employed, the most important results obtained, and the conclusions that were drawn from the study and require that the students further develop skills in reading, analysis, integration of knowledge and oral presentation of original science articles and reviews. Before the seminar, students are asked to become familiar with some of the speaker’s publications.  The students take notes during the seminar and later submit a one-page report on the speaker’s presentation.  The report should include the hypothesis that was tested, the techniques employed, the most important results obtained, and the conclusions that were drawn from the study. This course is a requirement and will be taken during the entire duration of the student’s time in the graduate program.

GPHY 5360 Laboratory Rotations as an Introduction to Modern Physiological Research: This course is designed to introduce the student to state-of-the-art research in physiology and is usually taken during the summer after the first-year of classes.  Students will learn molecular, cellular and/or whole-animal research techniques, which will equip them with some of the skills to investigate the physiology of the human body with a focus on cellular and molecular biology, membrane biophysics, and membrane transport physiology.  The student will work in a specific laboratory, assisting in ongoing research or conducting a new project.  Students sometimes decide to continue in the same laboratory for their master’s or doctoral project.

GPHY 6305 Advanced Topics in Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics: These courses consist of three research tracks (molecular, cellular, biophysics) and are designed with (a) appropriate contents for the student’s interests (with a potential dissertation in mind); (b) emphasis on depth (rather than breadth) of knowledge; (c) appropriate revisiting and utilization of relevant contents from first-year courses, at a greater depth; (d) development of skills in reading, analysis, integration of knowledge and presentation (both oral and written) of scientific problems.  The main activity of the course will be directed reading of original science articles and reviews, developing critical thinking skills and problem solving processes. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

GPHY 6000 Master’s Thesis: provides advanced research training in a faculty member’s laboratory after a student has successfully passed a “preliminary” examination based on courses taken during the first-year of study and has been admitted to candidacy for a master’s degree.  Students learn state-of-the-art research techniques that will allow them to investigate the physiology of the human body with a focus on cellular and molecular biology, membrane biophysics, and membrane transport physiology.  The student selects an advisory committee and then works in a faculty member’s laboratory, conducting his/her own research project.  After completing the project, publishing the results in one or more articles and writing a thesis, the student presents a research seminar to the faculty and then defends the thesis before his/her committee.  The master’s thesis describes the hypotheses tested, methods used and results obtained; moreover, the results are discussed in light of the hypotheses tested and the literature in that area.

GPHY 7000 Research: Students conduct research under the direct supervision of a mentor in selected areas of interest. It is expected that the student will learn and develop techniques pertinent to their research area. The student will also read and present literature findings and their own data to mentor and personnel in their respective laboratory.

GPHY 8000 Doctoral Dissertation: provides the student with advanced research training in a faculty member’s laboratory.  It is taken after a student has successfully passed a “qualifying” examination, which includes a written grant proposal and an oral exam, and has been admitted to candidacy for a doctoral degree.  Students learn molecular, cellular, and biophysical research techniques, which will equip them with some of the skills required to investigate the molecular, cellular and biophysical approaches.  The student selects a committee of faculty members to give advice and then works in a specific laboratory, conducting his/her own research project.  After completing the project, publishing the results in one or more articles and writing a dissertation, which describes the hypotheses tested, methods used and results obtained, students present a research seminar to the faculty of the department and then defend their dissertation before their committee.

GPHY 7103 Supervised Teaching in Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics: This course gives the student experience in organizing and presenting lectures.  The overall objective is to assist the student in developing the skills required to teach in any area of cell physiology and/or molecular biophysics.  Under faculty supervision, the student will lead small group conferences for first-year medical students and may also present lectures in some departmental graduate courses.


Please see handbook for graduate course schedule.

 




For additional information, contact:

Dr. Raul Martinez-Zaguilan
Graduate Program Advisor
Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics>
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
3601 4th Street, STOP 6551
Lubbock, Texas 79430-6551
Phone: (806) 743-2562
FAX: (806) 743-1512



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