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Research Faculty

docZonghan Dai, Ph.D.

Dai joined the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center faculty as an Associate Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine in 2006. Dr. Dai currently holds many positions at the center which include: Division Chief of Research in the Department of Internal Medicine; Associate Professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Biochemistry; Director of the Stem Cell Research Program in the Department of Internal Medicine and Associate Professor of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

 

Dr. Dai graduated from Shandong University in China and continued his education at the University of North Carolina and Duke University Medical Center, where he received his Fellowship in Molecular Biology.

 

Dr. Dai has published extensively and in 2008 was awarded the Dean’s Research Award by the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine. His current research projects include studying the role of the Abi pathway in breast cancer metastasis and exploring the utility of the pathway in the diagnosis and determination of prognosis in breast cancer patients.




 

 

docYunxia Tao, Ph.D

Tao joined the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center faculty as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine in 2006. Prior to that, she was an Assistant Professor in the Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension of the Department of Medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

 

Dr. Tao graduated from Shandong University in China and later received her Ph.D. from North Carolina State University in Physiology.

 

Dr. Tao has been published numerous peer-reviewed articles and completed many research projects. Some of Tao’s recent projects include “Targeted therapy for ovarian Cancer,” “The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) progression and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/VEGFR1 signaling in renal tumor growth and metastasis.” She is currently studying the role of VEGF in ADPKD disease progression.   ADPKD is the most common life-threatening hereditary renal disease and is characterized by the progressive development and enlargement of renal cysts.

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