TTUHSC Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
HomeBiomedical SciencesStudent Research Week

Student Research Week

SRW Logo

  • Student Research Week (SRW) is an interdisciplinary event organized every year by the students of Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX. The main objective of SRW is to showcase the research and thereof, build a platform for interaction. Past few years has witnessed distinguished speakers give seminars from various exciting fields such as Prions, Stem Cell Research, Phage Therapy, Fertilization, Aging, Biofilms, Vaccine Development and many more. Along with the seminar series, poster competition is arranged in which students from different biological research areas present their research projects and discuss their findings and ideas. Students from GSBS, Medical school, Nursing school, TTU campus, Amarillo campus, colleges from New Mexico and local colleges show great interest by participating in the poster competition.

  • Provide research seminars presented by distinguished biomedical scientists
  • Recruit regional students into GSBS degree programs

GSBS students organize the event and determine the overall seminar series theme. While the event has a biomedical theme, the poster sessions are open to all biological research areas. The judging criteria are set up to evaluate a hypothesis and the methods used to research that hypothesis, along with an ability to clearly present those original ideas.

Topics over the years:

  • 2014 - Molecular Imaging: Advancing Diagnostics
  • 2013 - Genomic Revolution: Personalizing Medicine
  • 2012 - Cure Diabetes
  • 2011 - Vaccine Development: A Shot in the Dark
  • 2010 - Demystifying the Brain: Aging and Addiction
  • 2009 - Molecular Pathways of Cancer
  • 2008 - Fertilization
  • 2007 - Phage Therapy
  • 2006 - Senescence
  • 2005 - Stem Cell Research
  • 2004 - Substance Abuse and Addiction
  • 2003 - Biofilms
  • 2002 - Cell Cycle, Cell Proliferation and Cancer
  • 2001 - Hypoxia and High Altitude Physiology
  • 2000 - Prions
©