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TTUHSC School of Medicine

TTUHSC School of Medicine

In almost every state in our country, medicine is being practiced by graduates of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine. We have an exciting story to tell... a story retold and reinvented each time a graduate makes a mark on the world.

Since 1969, we have graduated more than 2,700 physicians. Our original charter was to place more physicians in West Texas, an area of the state where many counties had none. Today, we are proud that more than 20 percent of the practicing physicians in West Texas graduated from our medical school and/or residency programs.

Our departments conduct research and foster scientific discovery that translate into better health solutions. From aging, cancer, diabetes, anesthesiology, and infectious diseases - just to name a few - the School of Medicine's strategy to enhance research programs is through supporting the faculty, students, residents, and staff with every available professional resource and expertise. A major initiative for the school is to provide quality lab space, recruit creative, innovative research faculty, and to develop graduate students and postdoctoral fellows for lifelong careers in medical research. Accomplishments during the last two years include: the renovation and construction of research space in Amarillo and Lubbock and continued and aggressive faculty recruitment with attractive start-up packages, and substantial increases in endowed chairs and external funding.

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Paul L Foster School of Medicine

Paul L. Foster School of Medicine

In 1999, then Texas Tech System Chancellor John T. Montford shared with the Board of Regents a vision for a full-fledged four-year medical school in El Paso. A four-year medical school in El Paso could help alleviate a severe shortage of physicians in the area. Currently, there are less than 110 physicians for every 100,000 people in El Paso. The national average is 198 physicians per 100,000 population. The Texas average is only 150 per 100,000. Studies have shown that most medical students remain in the region in which they received their education to establish their practices. The addition of the first two years of the medical school will allow students from El Paso and nearby regions to complete their education near home. It is hoped this effort will help retain doctors in the area.

On December 9, 2003, the ground breaking for El Paso Medical Science Building I took place and two years later, January 31, 2006, a ribbon cutting followed. The 93,000 square-foot facility will house research on diabetes, cancer, environmental health and infectious diseases, as well as a repository dedicated to data on Hispanic health and a genomic facility to link hereditary diseases in families. With the Hispanic population increasing throughout the United States, El Paso has become the new face of the nation. Understanding Hispanic and Border health issues will help scientists better understand the nation as a whole. Biomedical research conducted in El Paso will take on enormous importance and form the base of knowledge our country needs, for today and tomorrow.

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